Suicide and ASD

What does the research tell us? What can we do?

Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) experience higher rates of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts than people in the general population. This highlights a critical but not well recognized issue facing individuals living with ASD, their families, and the professionals and front line staff who engage with the ASD population.

This Worktopia Research Snippet summarizes the key areas discussed in the published paper titled, Suicidality in Autism Spectrum Disorder: a Commentary, authored by Lai, Rhee, Nicholas, 2017. It provides a high level overview of some of the risk factors for suicidality that are raised in the paper including personality factors, developmental and contextual factors, and external factors. The Snippet also looks at some of the things we can do to help support individuals living with these challenges such as greater risk awareness, prevention efforts and improved research and screening efforts.

To read more about what research is telling us related to suicide and ASD, and what we can do to help, click on the RESEARCH SNIPPET link below.

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